Friday, October 24, 2014

The Link Between Corporate Culture and Performance

Who Are We? What Do We Do? What Do We Stand For?

What is “corporate culture” and why it is important? Is it a predictor of corporate success?

In the simplest sense, “culture” refers to a system of values and norms that are shared by a group of people and gives its members a framework for thinking, planning and behaving. In this context, “values” represent the shared assumptions of what “ought” to be or, in other words, what the group believes to be right and desirable, while “norms” are the guidelines that define the expected behavior of group members in various circumstances.  Read more on the 4CS Blog

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Employee Engagement 101

“A superior leader is a person who can bring ordinary people together to achieve extraordinary results.” 
 
I learned this a few dozen years ago at Wharton, from an entrepreneur who had enjoyed tremendous success. He was right.
 
Employee engagement is not about hiring brilliant people who are uniquely talented. It is about bringing human beings together so that they magnify each other’s strengths. Read full article on Forbes

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Work/Life Balance for the Generations

In honor of National Work and Family Month, I wanted to talk about an unprecedented phenomenon occurring in today's workplace. For the first time ever, three generations are working together. Work/life balance is certainly not the same for each of these segments of the workforce. Employers need to take into consideration the unique work/life balance needs of each generation. It's much trickier than in the past and the lines have certainly blurred.

This is definitely not a "soft issue" as numerous studies have shown that one of the keys to U.S. competitiveness is work/life balance and a link between balance-friendly nations and low unemployment. A report by Accenture published in early 2013 found that two-thirds of respondents felt they could have it all. However, half felt they could not have it all the time, with 52% globally saying they had turned down jobs due to concerns about the impact on their work/life balance. Read more on Huffington Post

 
 

Monday, October 20, 2014

THE REAL REASONS WHY BOSSES AREN'T GIVING FEEDBACK

Despite the fact that millennials, hard-to-retain workers, and a large percentage of employees at all levels are screaming for more frequent feedback from their bosses, they’re not getting it.

I’ve seen this up close and personal in my role as an organization consultant for companies of diverse sizes, industries, and geographies. Over the last 25 years, I’ve interviewed more than 2,100 individuals, supervisors, managers, and executives and tracked the supply vs. demand for feedback from bosses. The conclusion: A growing gap between the amount of feedback employees want and how much bosses deliver.

Employee engagement surveys bear this out. Gallup’s massive longitudinal study shows there is no more important indicator of satisfaction and willingness to stay on the job than whether or not “someone in their workplace (usually a manager) has talked with them recently about how they’re doing on the job.” Over sixty percent of global employees report receiving too little feedback and a quarter of them report that they received no feedback at all from their supervisors--a major factor in their workplace dissatisfaction.  Continue reading on Fastcompany.com

Friday, October 17, 2014

The Economics Behind Employee Happiness

Happiness is a valuable strategic asset for an organization’s entire ecosystem.

Happiness. For many, it is hard to achieve and even more difficult to define. Psychologists, social scientists, and even economists have studied happiness for years. One recent study conducted by University College London found that it matters less whether things are going well for an individual than whether things were going better than expected.
Happiness has also been elusive in the workplace, particularly in recent years as headcounts have been kept low and corporate leaders remain focused on driving higher rates of productivity and profits. Yet studies have shown that employees who are happy and engaged in their work are more successful and are more likely to deliver satisfying customer experiences.

What can organizational leaders do better to drive happiness throughout the enterprise? Jenn Lim is CEO and Chief Happiness Officer at Delivering Happiness, an off-shoot of Zappos.com. Here, she shares her views on the obstacles to achieving happiness in the workplace, along with steps that senior executives can take to drive change.

Managers can boost creativity by 'empowering leadership' and earning employees' trust


Managers can promote creativity in employees by "empowering leadership" and earning employees' trust, according to a new study by Rice University and American University.

The researchers investigated, for the first time, the complex effect of the interaction among empowering leadership, uncertainty avoidance and trust on creativity. They collected supervisors' ratings of employee creativity in two separate studies in China: one with employees of an energy-saving light bulb design and manufacturing company and the other with the employees of a nonferrous metals manufacturing company.

"Our results reveal an interesting phenomenon," said Jing Zhou, the Houston Endowment Professor of Management at Rice's Jones Graduate School of Business.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

What's Troubling Tech Pros At Work?

In today's competitive hiring environment for technology professionals, how can executives retain their top talent? Keep them engaged with a defined career path, achievable goals and training opportunities, suggests a new Robert Half Technology survey. Forty-five per cent of information technology (IT) workers polled said being stuck in a job with few opportunities for professional advancement would cause them the most frustration on the job. Closely following were an unmanageable workload (43 per cent) and limited ability to learn new skills (39 per cent).

The survey, developed and conducted by Robert Half Technology, a leading provider of IT professionals on a project and full-time basis, includes responses from more than 2,300 IT workers in North America.

Technology professionals were asked, "In general, which three of the following situations would cause you the most frustration on the job?"  Read their responses on Yahoo Finance

How would your workforce answer these questions?

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

HOW TO GET EMPLOYEES TO CARE ABOUT THEIR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Jim sits in front of his workstation with a grin on his face as he prints off his training certificate. It’s proof that he completed a compulsory four-hour online course on workplace safety; in reality, it only took Jim 18 minutes to click through the videos and pass the assessment with educated guesses.

Does this sound familiar? It should. It’s typical of many companies’ approach to professional development, which is scary when you consider that U.S. companies spent more than $70 billion on corporate training in 2013.

To employees, training is often irrelevant, dull, and compliance-oriented, and leaders sometimes make the mistake of thinking training is a waste of time and money when they don’t see dramatic results right away. But when professional development programs work, they help companies attract and retain top talent, increase employee engagement and satisfaction, and boost innovation. Most importantly, when your team is excited about professional development, your employees are more likely to gain and retain knowledge that they can translate into real business results.

So why do so many hate professional development? It’s not the training itself, but how it’s executed. Here are a few pitfalls of ineffective professional development…READ IT ON FAST COMPANY

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

The Case For Quitting Your Job


When it comes to your work, is it time to move on?

Millions of Americans in their 50s and 60s are delaying retirement and holding on to jobs they have done for years. Many, of course, need the money. But many others say they simply enjoy—even love—what they do. And if that’s the case, why not stay?

The answer: Because jumping ship—even if jumping would seem to make little sense—could be the best way to remain productive, happy and healthy into old age.

The phenomenon of delayed retirement is well documented. Average retirement ages are climbing, and nearly half of baby boomers say they expect to work until age 66 or beyond, according to Gallup Inc. polls. Read more on WSJ

Monday, October 13, 2014

How to Communicate With Your Employees

How many times have you read: "Employees are our most important asset"? How can you say that employees are our most important asset and yet not be open and inclusive in the process of obtaining buy-in on critical and basic decisions? Some companies even make it difficult for employees to understand quarterly financial results when those same employees are stockholders. Why is it that if employees are truly so important to the success of most modern enterprises, they are frequently the last audience considered for important announcements and the first audience targeted for cost reductions? It is a dilemma that you will face regularly.

 

Read full article on HuffingtonPost.com

 

Communicaton is one of the critical 4Cs of Insightlink’s 4Cs employee survey. How well are you communicating what’s important to your employees?

Friday, October 10, 2014

A Fun Way to Boost Employee Engagement

While it might seem like a lot of work, implementing a rewards program for your employees is essential if you want to maintain a happy and productive workplace. Don’t believe us? A Gallup estimate shows that unhappy workers are costing employers $300 billion annually due to a loss in productivity.
This productivity loss manifests itself in a number of ways, from an increased number of sick days taken to a general slower work progress pace. The lack of productivity also results in a loss of work creativity and reduces overall drive to succeed within the company.
To foster a work environment that boosts happiness, productivity, and morale, you can certainly offer perks--in theory, these are great motivators, they won’t automatically boost employee engagement or foster brand advocacy. These perks need to be implemented as a part of a larger rewards and recognition program.  Read the full article on Entrepreneur
 
You can measure your current engagement levels with Insightlink’s acclaimed 4Cs Employee Survey

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Can Employers Fire Over Facebook Postings?

Firings for Alleged Social-Media Infractions Sometimes Backfire on Companies

Facebook gaffes that can cause trouble in the workplace aren't unique to drunken college students anymore. As more companies and their workers tap into the world of blogs, Twitter and Facebook, employers are tripping over legal potholes in social media.

Next week a National Labor Relations Board judge will consider whether a medical-transportation company illegally fired a worker after she criticized her boss on Facebook, in the federal agency's first complaint linked to social media.

In another case, workers sued a restaurant company when they were dismissed after managers accessed a private Myspace page the employees set up to chat about work.

Job seekers and employees have long been warned that risqué revelations on Facebook can jeopardize career prospects. But now companies are facing their own challenges for alleged blunders in dealing with social media.

Read more on WSJ